Owl Moon

Topic: Moon Phases

GRADES:  Kindergarten

STANDARDS:

K.ESS.2 Describe and compare objects seen in the night and day sky, observing that the sun and moon move across the sky.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and label the phases of the moon.

Materials needed:

  • Main Book:
    • Owl Moon, by Jane Yolen
  • Supplemental Books:
    • Many Moons, by James Thurber
    • The Moon Book, by Gail Gibbons
    • Faces of the Moon, by Bob Crelin
  • K.W.L. Chart
  • Paper Plate Moon Phases
  • Oreos (Make sure you have enough Oreos for each child to have 10.  8 Oreos for the project, 1 if they need to make a correction, 1 to eat.)
  • Plastic knives to scrape the icing on the Oreos.
  • Oreo Moons Printable (It can be the one shown below or another one found online.  There are many resources available with a similar handout.)
  • Moon Phases Assessment (Found on TeachersPayTeachers for free.)

Time needed:  60 minutes (Allow for additional preparation time before lesson.)

Engage:  

  • Create a K.W.L. Chart (in paper form or on a Smartboard) with students.
  • K – Have students describe what they already know about the moon.
  • W – Ask students what they would like to learn about the moon or questions they have.

  • Read Owl Moon aloud. Allow for questions, connections and ideas to be discussed during the reading.  Refer back to the K.W.L. chart throughout to see if questions were answered or add to the last column, “What We Have Learned.”

  • Discuss the phases of the moon, using a paper plate example up on the board.  This allows students to see a physical representation and will assist them in the exploration activity.

Explore:

  • Armed with the knowledge of the reading (and any additional books), students will have the opportunity to create the phases of the moon with the provided supplies.
  • Leave the paper plate phases of the moon up on the board so that students may have a large visual to assist them.
  • Their moon cycle must have 8 components: new moon, crescent, half moon, waxing gibbous, full moon, waning gibbous, half moon and crescent.

 (The STEM Labratory, on TeachersPayTeachers)

Explain:

  • Think
    • Encourage students to analyze their Oreo moons.
    • Did they create each phase of the moon?
    • Was it difficult to create the phases? What would have made it easier?
    • What is their favorite moon phase?
    • If they were to create this again, what materials would they like to use next time?
  • Pair
    • Pair students up with a partner and have them complete the, “Phases of the MOon,” handout together to assess comprehension and ability to work with a partner.
  • Share
    • Complete the, “What We Learned,” column of the K.W.L. chart as a group.

 

Expand:

  • Have students track the different phases of the moon at home, for an entire month.  Each night students can color in the picture of the moon based on how they see it.  At the end of each week, bring the moon logs to group time to discuss the student’s current findings!

A Tree is Nice

Image result for tree Image result for a tree is nice lesson plan Image result for tree

Topic: Parts of a Tree

Grades:  K, 1, 2

Standards:

K.LS.1 Describe and compare the growth and development of common living plants and animals.

K.LS.2 Describe and compare the physical features of common living plants and animals.

K.LS.3 Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive).

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and label parts of a tree.

Materials needed:

  • Main Book:
    • A Tree is Nice, by Janice May Udry
  • Supplemental Books:
    • A Tree is a Plant, by Clyde Robert Bulla
    • From Seed to Plant, by Gail Gibbons
    • A Grand Old Tree, by Mary Newell DePalma
  • K.W.L. Chart
  • Tree Review Handout
  • 20+ Toilet Paper Tubes (enough for each student to have one)
  • Scissors for each student
  • Cardboard (a cereal box) or Card stock
  • 100+ Cotton Balls (each student should have at least 5)
  • Green Food Coloring or Green Liquid Water Color
  • Plastic Cups (to put the food coloring or liquid water color in)
  • Paintbrushes for each student
  • Masking Tape
  • Glue
  • Twine or Brown Yarn

Time needed:  30-45 minutes (Allow for additional preparation time before lesson.)

Engage:  

  • Create a K.W.L. Chart (in paper form or on a Smartboard) with students.
  • K – Have students describe what they already know about trees.
  • W – Ask students what they would like to learn about trees or questions they have.

Image result for parts of a tree kwl chart

  • Read A Tree is Nice aloud. Allow for questions, connections and ideas to be discussed during the reading.  Refer back to the K.W.L. chart throughout to see if questions were answered or add to the last column, “What We Have Learned.”

Tree Parts

  • Based off of what was read and discussed, have students fill in, “The Parts of a Tree,” on the board.

Explore:

  • Armed with the knowledge of the reading (and any additional books), students will have the opportunity to create a tree of their own with the supplies provided.
  • An example of the tree can be provided (steps shown below) or students can be given the materials and freedom to create their own version of a tree.
  • Their tree must show: leaves, branches, trunk, and roots in some fashion.

            

Explain:

  • Think
    • Encourage students to analyze their tree.
    • What parts of the tree did they include?
    • Why are those parts important?
    • Do they know of other plants that are similar to trees and how they grow?
    • If they were to create this again, what materials would they like to use next time?
  • Pair
    • Pair students up with a partner and have them complete the, “Parts of a Tree,” handout together to assess comprehension and ability to work with a partner.
  • Share
    • Complete the, “What We Learned,” column of the K.W.L. chart as a group.

Tree

 

Expand:

  • Explore the parts of a tree in detail with some of the following activities:
    • Bark/Trunk – Tree Rubbings
    • Leaves – How Does a Leaf Get Water Experiment, Painting with Leaves
      • Experiment – Bloglovin’ learnplayimagine.com

    

The Dumpster Diver

Dumpster Diver

Title: The Dumpster Diver

Author: Janet Wong

Illustrator: David Roberts

Summary:

Steve is an electrician who dives for buried treasure in the alley behind his building. Steve, along with three other kids from the apartment building, form the diving team. They help Steve find treasures and turn an old blender into a lamp and an old lamp into a table. One day, Steve gets hurt diving for treasure, and the rest of the team go door to door collecting other’s useful junk. Instead of diving through trash, they build a wheelchair for Steve!

Curriculum Connections:

Engineering

Creativity

Recycling

Extra Yarn

Extra Yarn.jpg

Title: Extra Yarn

Author: Mac Barnett

Illustrator: Jon Klassen

Summary:

Annabelle lives in a cold, little town where everything is either the white of snow or the black of chimney soot. She finds a box filled with yarn of every color. She knits a sweater for herself and for her dog. Soon she knits a sweater for everyone in her class and in her town. She knits sweaters for animals and houses and still she has extra yarn. One day, an archduke arrived in town and demanded to buy the yarn that never ran out. She refused to sell it, but later that night he robbed the yarn from her home. He went home, opened the box of yarn, and found it empty. He angrily threw it out the window into the ocean, where it traveled back to the little town and found its way back to Annabelle, full of colorful extra yarn.

Curriculum Connections:

Creativity

Metaphorical illustrations

Community

Literary refrains

Measuring Penny

Measuring Penny

Title: Measuring Penny

Author: Loreen Leedy

Summary:

Lisa’s homework assignment is to measure something. It can be anything, so Lisa decides to measure her dog, Penny! Lisa and Penny go to the dog park, where they can measure Penny and compare the measurements to the other dogs. Penny’s nose is 1 inch long and a Shetland Sheepdog’s nose is 4 inches. Penny’s tail is 1 dog biscuit long and a Greyhound’s tail is 10 dog biscuits long! After they finish at the park, Lisa and her dad make dog biscuits, being careful to measure out every ingredient. In the end, she measures the value of having Penny at 1 million dollars!

Curriculum Connections:

Measurement

Units of measure

Comparisons

Nonstandard measurement tools

Wolf in the Snow

wolf in the snow

Title: Wolf in the Snow

Author: Matthew Cordell

Summary: A girl leaves school only to be caught in a snowstorm on her walk home. A wolf pup is lost in the same storm. They find each other in the storm, but how will they make it home? Wolf in the Snow is the winner of the 2018 Caldecott Medal. This wordless picture book tells a story through rich and detailed illustrations.

Curriculum Connections:

Storytelling

Cause and Effect

Animal Families

Predicting Outcomes

Compassion

 

 

Lemonade

Lemonade

Title: Lemonade: And Other Poems Squeezed from a Single Word

Author: Bob Raczka

Illustrator: Nancy Doniger

Summary: Lemonade is a collection of twenty-two poems created from twenty-two words. The poems are formed by using only the letters from a single word. It turns word puzzles into poetry that are thoughtful, funny, and clever.

constellation
a
silent
lion
tells
an
ancient
tale

Curriculum Connections:

Poetry

Vocabulary

Writing

What Do You Do with a Tail Like This?

What do you do with a tail like this

Title: What Do You Do with a Tail Like This?

Authors: Steve Jenkins and Robin Page

Summary:

Moles use their noses to find their way underground. Jackrabbits use their ears to keep cool. Mountain goats use their feet to jump from ledge to ledge. Monkeys use their tails to hang from trees. Explore how different animals use their noses, ears, tails, eyes, mouths, and feet in different ways. See if you can guess which animal the part belongs to and how that animal uses it before turning the page!

Curriculum Connections:

Animals

Animal Behaviors

Animal Habitats

Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science

Ada Lovelace

Title: Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer

Author: Diane Stanley

Illustrator: Jessie Hartland

Summary:

Ada Byron, daughter of poet Lord Byron, dreamed of being able to fly. She studied the anatomy of birds and designed wings. However, her imagination worried her mother who was concerned she would become too much like her father. Her mother decided to give her a world-class scientific education, but her imagination was not harmed in the least. Ava later met Charles Babbage who was working on a calculating machine and wanted Ava to work with him. Before Ava could start a profession, she was married to William, Earl of Lovelace, and she became Ava Lovelace. Years later, Ava and Babbage began working on the Analytical Machine, the first all-purpose digital computer. Ava needed to explain to people how the machine would be able to read the symbols and rules the user wanted it to. Ava’s demonstration on how to code the numbers became the first computer program ever published.

Curriculum Connections:

Engineering

Coding

Computer programming

History

Biography

Betty’s Burgled Bakery

Bettys Burgled Bakery

Title: Betty’s Burgled Bakery

Author: Travis Nichols

Summary:

Betty’s bakery has been burgled and the Gumshoe Zoo is on the case. The counters and cupboards were completely cleared of carrot cake, cornbread, and crackers. Will they find the fully fed, fiendish foe? Join the Gumshoe Zoo on this alliteration adventure.

Curriculum Connections:

Alliteration

Language

Vocabulary