A Fine Dessert!

TOPIC:  EXPLORING THE PAST THROUGH FOOD TRADITIONS

GRADES:  1 and 2

STANDARDS:

GRADE 1:  THE HOME, SCHOOL AND NEIGHBORHOOD, HISTORY 1.1.5

GRADE 2:  THE HOME, SCHOOL AND NEIGHBORHOOD, HISTORY 2.1.2

MATH 2.M.4

                

Materials needed:

Book:  A Fine Dessert, by Emily Jenkins, illustrated by Sophie Blackall

Note:  The following recipe makes enough blackberry fool for each student in a class of 20-24, to have a small bathroom size (Dixie) cup of the dessert.  If you have a larger class size, simply double the recipe to make sure you have enough for each student to sample their creations!

2 ½ cups of blackberries (or mixed frozen berries, thawed)

½ cup granulated sugar, divided in two

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 ½ cups heavy cream

Two large bowls- one for the berry mixture, and one for the whipped cream

Measuring tools

Hand mixer

Small cups (like Dixie bathroom cups) and spoons for each student

30-45-minutes-on-a-clock

Time needed:  30- 45 minutes

Engage:     

Tell students that we are going to enjoy a story that follows a dessert through four families and four hundred years!   Tell them to pay special attention to the similarities and differences from family to family.  Tell them we will stop at different times and talk about the details they notice.

When we finish the story, we will make the same dessert that the families enjoy in the book!

Read and discuss:

Read the book to students, stopping to ask them about the similarities in tools and technology used by the families.  They will also notice that in the past, families picked blackberries and used milk from their own cows.  Families also had different ways of keeping food fresh in the past, as electric refrigerators were not in existence in the 1700s and 1800s!  Allow students to make their own observations as you read.  Many will also notice that the time spent beating the cream to make whipped cream is decreasing with each one hundred years.  They may even start to make predictions of how much time it will take to beat the cream into whipped cream.

 

Have fun!:

Set up a table at the front of the room, and call different students up to read parts of the recipe, and then measure the ingredients into the bowls.  Once you get the whipping cream and sugar in the bowl, you can call students up in small groups and allow them to see the changes happening to the cream as it is beaten.

When the berries and sugar are mixed in a bowl, and the cream is beat into whipping cream in a separate bowl, scoop a tablespoon of the cream into a Dixie cup, and put a tablespoon of berries on top.  Hand out the cups of dessert like this to the students along with spoons, and allow them to mix and swirl the berries with the cream.

Enjoy!

Posted by Kim Angell, Children’s Assistant